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Authors

KenLopez resized 152

Ken Lopez founded A2L Consulting in 1995. The firm has since worked with litigators from all major law firms on more than 10,000 cases with over $2 trillion cumulatively at stake.  The A2L team is comprised of psychologists, jury consultants, trial consultants, litigation consultants, attorneys and information designers who provide jury consulting, litigation graphics and trial technology.  Ken Lopez can be reached at lopez@A2LC.com.


ryanflax blog litigation consultant 

Ryan H. Flax, Esq., Managing Director, Litigation Consulting, joined A2L Consulting on the heels of practicing Intellectual Property (IP) law as part of the Intellectual Property team at Dickstein Shapiro LLP, a national law firm based in Washington, DC.  Over the course of his career, Ryan has obtained jury verdicts totaling well over $1 billion in damages on behalf of his clients and has helped clients navigate the turbulent waters of their competitors’ patents.  Ryan can be reached at flax@a2lc.com.


dr laurie kuslansky jury consultant a2l consulting
Laurie R. Kuslansky, Ph.D, Managing Director, Trial & Jury Consulting, has conducted over 400 mock trials in more than 1,000 litigation engagements over the past 20 years. Dr. Kuslansky's goal is to provide the highest level of personalized client service possible whether one's need involves a mock trial, witness preparation, jury selection or a mock exercise not involving a jury. Dr. Kuslansky can be reached at kuslansky@A2LC.com.

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10 Things Litigation Consultants Do That WOW Litigators

 

 

litigation consultants wow factor best top ratedby Ken Lopez
Founder/CEO
A2L Consulting

As CEO of a litigation consulting firm offering litigation graphics consulting services, jury consulting services and trial technology support services, I hear the word "wow" quite often from A2L's clients, and I know our talented competitor firms hear the same. Usually, when I hear it, someone has wildly exceeded a client's expectations, one of our people came through in a pinch or someone on our team went without sleep for even longer than the litigator.

Whatever the reason for the "wow," I'm thrilled to hear it since it means we've truly delighted a customer. I've written about my passion for good customer service in the past in Litigators, You Deserve Ritz-Carlton-Level Service and 15 Tips for Great Customer Service from the Restaurant Industry. I believe great customer is just a minimum standard in the litigation consulting industry, and at our firm, we are really striving for delight.

Here are 10 situations where litigation consultants like A2L Consulting and other firms like ours often hear the word, "wow."

  1. Wow, you came in at or under budget: One of well-known competitors has struggled recently, and I think one of the biggest reasons was their constant lowballing on estimates. For them, it seemed every major case was estimated at $25K but the invoice always ended up closer to $250K. At A2L and at other great firms, we do a great job of setting expectations accurately. We often hear a "wow" around budget especially since we so often use fixed fee pricing and other alternative fee arrangements to delight customers. See 12 Alternative Fee Arrangements We Use and You Could Too.
     
  2. Wow, our jury behaved just like the mock jury: It is an amazing experience to watch a group of jurors arrive at a nearly identical outcome to those in a mock jury. While we often emphasize that a mock trial should be used primarily support voir dire, for practice and for hearing how mock jurors reason through your case during deliberations as opposed to a predictive tool, it is still fascinating to see a jury behave quite similarly to a mock jury. See Mock Trials: Do They Work? Are They Valuable?.

  3. Wow, the jury loved that demonstrative: When A2L started almost 20 years ago, we were exclusively a litigation graphics firm. We've since become known as one of the best in the jury consulting and trial technology spaces too. Still, after all these years, we have worked on more litigation graphics projects than any other type of project and probably more than most any other firm. Not surprisingly, we often hear about how a demonstrative we developed resonated with a jury. The litigators often seem surprised, but honestly, we're not. It's just what we do. See 16 PowerPoint Litigation Graphics You Won't Believe Are PowerPoint.

  4. Wow, you found a way to show that: It is fairly common that I hear this "wow" comment. A trial team, made up of brilliant lawyers, has been working on a case for years. They've struggled to find a way to persuasively describe a particular point, technology or set of facts. Through our creative process, our litigation consultants find just the right rhetorical technique or demonstrative exhibit that conveys a complex point efficiently and persuasively. See Courtroom Exhibits: Analogies and Metaphors as Persuasion Devices and Information Design and Litigation Graphics.

  5. Wow, you stayed right there with us: Usually when we hear this "wow" it means we were sleep deprived. More specifically, it is typically one of our trial technicians who was the most sleep deprived. These amazing consultants help make last minute changes to the trial presentation, prepare deposition clips and evidence for display and handle the running of the electronic show at trial that makes a lawyer look like a star or a flop. Often they stay awake for days at a time leading up to trial. See What Does Using a Trial Technician or Hot-Seater Cost? and 11 Traits of Great Courtroom Trial Technicians.
     
  6. Wow, I didn't know people did what you do: We have been litigation consultants for 20 years, but the industry is still quite young. While most litigators understand there are people who do demonstratives, jury and trial work, few understand that litigation consultants can be active coaches to litigators, can support theme and story development and do much more to help a litigator prepare a case. See Accepting Litigation Consulting is the New Hurdle for Litigators and 11 Small Projects You Probably Don't Think Litigation Consultants Do and 11 Things Your Colleagues Pay Litigation Consultants to Do.
     
  7. Wow, our judge praised your work on the record: This happens at least once a year, and my favorite clients take the time to send me the transcript. One judge in the Court of Federal Claims said, "These animations are fabulous. I have to commend the plaintiff . . . it's really fantastic." Another District Court Judge asked if our trial technician could help oppossing counsel get their presentation to work.
     
  8. Wow, you actually helped me improve as a litigator: This is really my favorite "wow" compliment although I rarely hear it. It takes someone with a lot of humility to believe it and then to say it, but some do, and it's amazing. We really do care about helping our clients win, and we hope to leave them a little better prepared for the next case as a result of having worked with our litigation consultants at A2L.
     
  9. Wow, you should have seen oppossing counsel when . . . : This is a wide category of wow. Sometimes we hear this because our trial tech was so much better than the other side's trial tech. Sometimes we hear this because our litigation graphics were so much better than the opposition. Regardless, we're quite competitive at A2L, and we live and breathe our cases. We love winning, but we often love defeating our opponent more. Many of our favorite customers feel exactly the same way.

  10. Wow, sorry, I don't have any suggestions for how you can improve: I'm big on post-trial debriefs. I wrote an article titled 9 Questions to Ask in Your Litigation Postmortem or Debrief that I think summarizes my feelings around this topic pretty well. Bottom line though, I love when a client answers my oft asked question, "on a scale of 1-10, how likely would you be to recommend A2L to a colleague?" with a "10." I'm happy to say I hear that answer quite often.
     
litigation consulting graphics jury trial technology

About A2L Consulting

•  Leading national litigation consulting firm since 1995

•  Personnel nationwide

•  Routinely voted #1 for demonstrative evidence consulting, jury consulting or intellectual property litigation consulting nationally

•  Consulted for all major law firms on 10,000+ cases with trillions of dollars cumulatively at stake offering:

Trial Consulting: mock trials, Micro-Mock™, mock Markman hearings, jury consulting, shadow juries, jury selection and more; 

Trial Graphics: legal graphics and litigation graphics, courtroom animation, video, printed foam core trial exhibits, PowerPoint presentation consulting, simplifying the case story and more; 

Trial Technology & Onsite Personnel: ebriefs (electronic briefs), hot seat operators, trial technicians, courtroom presentations and more; 

Look for A2L trial consultants, graphics consultants and jury consultants in Washington, DC, Baltimore, MD, New York, NY, Boston, MA, Alexandria, VA, Atlanta, GA, Miami, FL, Chicago, IL, Houston, Texas, Los Angeles, CA, and San Francisco, California, Wilmington, Delaware, Philadelphia, PA, Phoenix, AZ, San Antonio, Palo Alto, Dallas, Detroit, Baltimore, Cleveland, Kansas City, Las Vegas, Pittsburgh, Richmond, VA, Salt Lake City, Denver, London, Dublin, Johannesburg, Brussels and many other cities and countries around the world. A2L Contact Information


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Mock Trials: Do They Work? Are They Valuable?

 


do mock trials work value juryby Elise Jefferson, M.A.
A2L Consulting

One might think it would be easy to run an experiment that could definitively conclude that mock trials are effective at predicting the outcome of a trial. If one could, it would solidify the value of mock trials in the eyes of litigators and consultants, and it would make mock trials a nearly mandatory part of the trial preparation process.

However, like many areas of trial preparation, mock jury trials are complex and involve an almost infinite number of variables. Because of this, it can be difficult to isolate a single dependent variable for study, while controlling for all of the other factors that may affect an experimenter’s ability to conclude that there is a causal link between the variable that was manipulated and the outcome of the trial.

Therefore, the question remains as to whether or not mock trials are at all effective. After all, if there cannot be a direct causal link drawn between a variable and the outcome, then how can one say that mock trials are worthwhile?

Historically, instead of attempting to address the overall question of the effectiveness of mock trial simulations, psychologists have focused their study of mock trials on what information can be gleaned from the mock trial process. Studies of the process have illuminated the many valuable aspects of mock trial simulations.

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The strength of the evidence presented in a trial has been shown to be one of the highest predictors of jury outcomes. Studies have found, not surprisingly, a positive correlation between evidence strength and liability or determinations of guilt (Devine et. al., 2001; Winter & Robicheaux).  As such, it is prudent for attorneys to use the mock trial process to evaluate how a jury or judge receives their evidence, in comparison to the opposing side’s evidence. In psychological research, the definition of “strength of the evidence” varies based on the study, with some studies using the quantity of evidence as the independent variable and others using the quality of evidence (Devine et. al., 2001; Winter & Robicheaux).

A study conducted by Taylor and Hosch (2004) found that the strength of prosecutorial evidence in criminal cases was strongly correlated to the defendant’s likelihood of facing conviction. This finding can be applied to civil trials, because when a jury is determining whether the preponderance of evidence requirement has been met, they will consider the quantity of evidence in order to come to their conclusion. Therefore, litigators can reliably use mock trial simulations to determine whether or not their evidence is strong enough to warrant going to trial in civil cases.

As mentioned in several articles on the A2L website, mock trials can assist in the fine-tuning of story formatting and presentation. There are multiple theories surrounding juror decision making, including both mathematical and explanation-based approaches. The most relevant explanation-based approach focuses on the use of a story model to explain the facts of a case to jurors. The story model states that jurors typically assimilate trial evidence into a story format (Winter & Robicheaux). As such, attorney presentation style should be geared toward making it easier for jurors to put the evidence into the story format. Litigators can test the effectiveness of various story formats through the use of a mock trial simulation. A study conducted by Pennington and Hastie (1988) found that jurors were more prone to decide in favor of the side that used a story format, as opposed to requiring jurors to construct their own story from those told by witnesses presented in a random fashion. Therefore, it is important for attorneys to consider what story best fits the evidence they will be presenting. Mock trials can be used to determine which story jurors are more likely to believe and determine how that story lines up with their knowledge of how the world works. A2L offers a storytelling webinar and an e-book focusing on storytelling in litigation.

The ability to definitively label mock trial simulations as completely accurate in predicting trial outcomes would require extensive research and controlled experimentation. Until such research is undertaken, studies show that mock trials can be extremely helpful in helping attorneys develop a strong case. These simulations can be especially effective in determining the strength of the evidence and selecting the appropriate story format.

Other useful articles related to mock trials, jury consulting and litigation consulting on A2L Consulting's site:

jury consulting trial consulting jury research

About A2L Consulting

•  Leading national litigation consulting firm since 1995

•  Personnel nationwide

•  Routinely voted #1 for demonstrative evidence consulting, jury consulting or intellectual property litigation consulting nationally

•  Consulted for all major law firms on 10,000+ cases with trillions of dollars cumulatively at stake offering:

Trial Consulting: mock trials, Micro-Mock™, mock Markman hearings, jury consulting, shadow juries, jury selection and more; 

Trial Graphics: legal graphics and litigation graphics, courtroom animation, video, printed foam core trial exhibits, PowerPoint presentation consulting, simplifying the case story and more; 

Trial Technology & Onsite Personnel: ebriefs (electronic briefs), hot seat operators, trial technicians, courtroom presentations and more; 

Look for A2L trial consultants, graphics consultants and jury consultants in Washington, DC, Baltimore, MD, New York, NY, Boston, MA, Alexandria, VA, Atlanta, GA, Miami, FL, Chicago, IL, Houston, Texas, Los Angeles, CA, and San Francisco, California, Wilmington, Delaware, Philadelphia, PA, Phoenix, AZ, San Antonio, Palo Alto, Dallas, Detroit, Baltimore, Cleveland, Kansas City, Las Vegas, Pittsburgh, Richmond, VA, Salt Lake City, Denver, London, Dublin, Johannesburg, Brussels and many other cities and countries around the world. A2L Contact Information


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7 Questions Will Save You Money with Litigation Graphics Consultants

 


litigation graphics consultants types stylesby Ken Lopez

Founder/CEO
A2L Consulting

I have been running an organization that offers litigation graphics consulting as one of its services for nearly 20 years. I've worked with both large and small law firms, I have worked with clients in many countries, and I have worked on large and small cases.

After all that experience, spanning thousands of cases, I can split up the clients who engage A2L Consulting for litigation graphics consulting work into two camps:

  • "Do This" Clients
  • "Help Us" Clients

Some clients come to A2L and say, this case is complicated, we've been working on it for years, and we're just too close to it to be able to explain it in a way that everyday people can understand. These are the "help us" clients.

Some clients come to us and say, "I litigate four patent cases and year, and I know what works. Can you make something like . . ." or "we need a litigation animation that shows exactly what our environmental expert says." These are the "do this" style clients.

Both types of clients are warmly welcomed at A2L and at other litigation graphics consulting firms. However, there is a real risk of wasting time and money when litigation graphics consultants are trying to "help" advise a "do this" client and vice versa. Thus, it is very valuable when a litigator knows what type of client they are before they engage litigation graphics consultants.

There are many firms in the litigation graphics business, however the truly great litigation graphics consulting firms are led by former litigators with meaningful and significant trial experience. You can count the number of these firms worldwide on one hand, and I really only know of A2L and our good friends at Cogent Legal. Firms like ours are capable of helping to develop themes, helping to craft opening statements as well as helping to design a presentation that will teach and persuade a jury in a complex case.

Our firm has personnel to support both the "help us" and "do this" clients. Not surprisingly, they come a different price points, though. Thus, in the beginning of an engagement, our litigation graphics consultants are trained to assess what type of client they are going to be supporting. Then, we staff accordingly. This works well unless the trial team shifts from "do this" to "help us" in the middle of case preparation. That's not uncommon.

I think it is possible for a litigator or trial team to self-assess and communicate their preferred style to their litigation graphics firm of choice. Doing so will save time and money since the litigation graphics firm can staff the project correctly from the beginning.

If there are opposing styles on a trial team, conducting a self-assessment of your team's style is critical. When there are opposing styles, it presents a challenge to a litigation graphics firm that they are not always in the best position to solve.

To self-assess and decide whether your team is taking a "do this" or "help us" approach to your upcoming trial (or mock trial or ADR event), ask yourselves these seven questions and keep track of your score out of seven:

  • Does our trial team know exactly what the judge and/or jury will understand about our case and what they won't. If no, give yourself one point.
     
  • Would most people consider our case complicated? If yes, give yourself one point.
     
  • Has our trial team sufficiently prepped our experts so that just about anyone can understand them and be persuaded by them? If no, give yourself one point.

  • Has our trial team developed a meaningful and emotional story, narrative and theme that the fact-finder(s) will relate to? If no, give yourself one point.

  • Does our team have access to most of the visuals we plan to use for the case already from our experts and clients? If no, give yourself one point.

  • Has our trial team simplified our case to the point where one could explain it convincingly to a driver in a short cab ride? If no, give yourself one point.

  • Could our lead litigator explain why we deserve to win to my Mom in five minutes or less? If no, give yourself one point. 
If you have scored three points or higher, your team would likely benefit from a consultative "help us" approach to developing litigation graphics. If you scored a one or a two, you can safely tell your litigation graphics consultants that you know what you need, and you just need them to listen and get it done.
If you are in that three points and higher consultative "help us" category, remember that you have very few real expert litigation graphics firms that you could rely on to offer science-proven advice (as opposed to the gut instinct of an artist or project manager). If you are serious about the consultative approach and are passionate about winning, I recommend using a firm that will offer a former litigator as your lead consultant. It is an amazing experience to be supported by someone at this level, and it saves time, money and energy.

Here are some articles related to litigation graphics, trial graphics and demonstrative evidence from A2L that you may also find helpful:

using litigation graphics courtroom to persuade trial graphics a2l consulting

About A2L Consulting

•  Leading national litigation consulting firm since 1995

•  Personnel nationwide

•  Routinely voted #1 for demonstrative evidence consulting, jury consulting or intellectual property litigation consulting nationally

•  Consulted for all major law firms on 10,000+ cases with trillions of dollars cumulatively at stake offering:

Trial Consulting: mock trials, Micro-Mock™, mock Markman hearings, jury consulting, shadow juries, jury selection and more; 

Trial Graphics: legal graphics and litigation graphics, courtroom animation, video, printed foam core trial exhibits, PowerPoint presentation consulting, simplifying the case story and more; 

Trial Technology & Onsite Personnel: ebriefs (electronic briefs), hot seat operators, trial technicians, courtroom presentations and more; 

Look for A2L trial consultants, graphics consultants and jury consultants in Washington, DC, Baltimore, MD, New York, NY, Boston, MA, Alexandria, VA, Atlanta, GA, Miami, FL, Chicago, IL, Houston, Texas, Los Angeles, CA, and San Francisco, California, Wilmington, Delaware, Philadelphia, PA, Phoenix, AZ, San Antonio, Palo Alto, Dallas, Detroit, Baltimore, Cleveland, Kansas City, Las Vegas, Pittsburgh, Richmond, VA, Salt Lake City, Denver, London, Dublin, Johannesburg, Brussels and many other cities and countries around the world. A2L Contact Information


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The Top 12 Litigation Consulting Articles from Q2

 

 

top 12 articles a2l consulting litigation consulting report q2by Ken Lopez
Founder/CEO
A2L Consulting

Long time readers of this blog know that we are big on lists. When the American Bar Association named the Litigation Consulting Report one of the top 100 legal industry blogs, even they said, "it's hard to resist the infectious numbered-list headlines that keep us reading their chatty, first-person posts answering questions we hadn't yet thought to ask."

At least once per quarter, I try to highlight recent articles that were unusually popular. It's easy to miss a great article with so much being published weekly. Today, I am highlighting the top twelve articles published last quarter.

During the second quarter of 2014, voir dire, PowerPoint litigation graphics and persuasion were very popular topics. These, plus other predictable terms related to our litigation graphics, jury consulting, in-court trial technology support and visual persuasion consulting services are, not surprisingly, among the top ways people find A2L when they search the Internet.

Recently, the top five search terms for people that found A2L's site all relate to jury selection or witness preparation in some way. Thus, it's not surprising that these consulting services are some of our most in-demand services with mock exercises lining up for end-of-2014 and 2015 trials.

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Enjoy the top 12 articles from the Litigation Consulting Report blog from the second quarter of 2014:
 

12. 5 Tips for Displaying Documents Well at Trial [CVN Video]

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11. The 13 Biggest Reasons to Avoid Last-Minute Trial Preparation

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10. The Magic of a 30:1 Presentation Preparation Ratio

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9. Good-Looking Graphic Design ≠ Good-Working Visual Persuasion

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8. 5 Ways to Apply Active Teaching Methods for Better Persuasion

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7. Hurry Up and Wait - Using Silence in Depositions

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6. What is Visual Persuasion and What Do You Need to Know About It?

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5. 4 Tips for Stealing Thunder in the Courtroom

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4. Walking the Line: Don't Coach Your Experts (Re: Apple v. Samsung)

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3. 7 Ways to Avoid Making Your PowerPoint Slides Your Handout

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2. Top 15 Litigation E-Books & Webinars from the Past 12 Months

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1. 5 Voir Dire Questions to Avoid

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litigation consulting graphics jury trial technology

About A2L Consulting

•  Leading national litigation consulting firm since 1995

•  Personnel nationwide

•  Routinely voted #1 for demonstrative evidence consulting, jury consulting or intellectual property litigation consulting nationally

•  Consulted for all major law firms on 10,000+ cases with trillions of dollars cumulatively at stake offering:

Trial Consulting: mock trials, Micro-Mock™, mock Markman hearings, jury consulting, shadow juries, jury selection and more; 

Trial Graphics: legal graphics and litigation graphics, courtroom animation, video, printed foam core trial exhibits, PowerPoint presentation consulting, simplifying the case story and more; 

Trial Technology & Onsite Personnel: ebriefs (electronic briefs), hot seat operators, trial technicians, courtroom presentations and more; 

Look for A2L trial consultants, graphics consultants and jury consultants in Washington, DC, Baltimore, MD, New York, NY, Boston, MA, Alexandria, VA, Atlanta, GA, Miami, FL, Chicago, IL, Houston, Texas, Los Angeles, CA, and San Francisco, California, Wilmington, Delaware, Philadelphia, PA, Phoenix, AZ, San Antonio, Palo Alto, Dallas, Detroit, Baltimore, Cleveland, Kansas City, Las Vegas, Pittsburgh, Richmond, VA, Salt Lake City, Denver, London, Dublin, Johannesburg, Brussels and many other cities and countries around the world. A2L Contact Information


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3 Articles Discussing What Jurors Really Think About You

 

 

what do jurors think about lawyersby Ken Lopez
Founder/CEO
A2L Consulting

I enjoy reading any article about juror feedback. However, finding such articles is pretty tough. Few authors have the time, budget or access to jurors to ask them what they think about the experience of trial and the lawyers involved.

As a litigation consultant, I have had the privilege of seeing many trials and mock trials over the past 20 years. In that time, I've observed certain characteristics that all mock juries possess. My colleague, Dr. Laurie Kuslansky, wrote a great article about commonalities among mock juries that is one of the best I have seen on the subject. Still, while we litigation consultants spend quite a bit of time with juries and mock juries, there is real value in hearing what others, such as judges and law professors have observed through study.

Below are three articles that offer meaningful insight into the minds of jurors. I think by reviewing these articles, any litigator will be better prepared for trial.

1. What Jurors Think About Attorneys: What if a judge collected data over a ten-year period from more than 500 jurors and compiled it in a meaningful way? Well, that is exactly what one Minnesota state court judge did, and the recently published results are fascinating.

Eighty-nine percent of this judge's jury trials were criminal. His goal in surveying his juries was to collect data about many aspects of the trial from the court building to the evidence displayed to the performance of counsel. The jurors were mostly from a rural part of the state.

You should read Judge Hoolihan's article. I found some of the interesting takeaways to be these:

  • Jurors tended to rate attorneys highest when they represented the prevailing party. From the data, I can't tell whether jurors tended to side with the attorneys that they liked best, or whether the high ratings were the result of a form of the Ben Franklin effect where jurors tended to like the people they sided with more, simply because they sided with them.
     
  • Jurors rated defense lawyers lower than plaintiff-side lawyers who were mostly prosecutors. Judge Hoolihan wonders whether this results from an anti-defense lawyer bias generated by Hollywood, but I would ask whether this is because the government generally has an advantage. I suspect it is mostly the latter.
     
  • Jurors tended to rate defense attorneys much lower when they lost a case compared to the ratings of plaintiff side attorneys when they lost.
     
  • Jurors wanted to see and hear more evidence.

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2. Trial Presentation Too Slick? Here's Why You Can Stop Worrying: I wrote this article in 2011, and the real focus of the article is on a trial consultant who smartly took the time to interview a jury post-trial and record it. The results are fascinating, especially when you consider that this was a rural Arkansas jury. The jurors shared that:

  • Jurors expect the use of technology.

  • Jurors expect the use of PowerPoint.
     
  • Video depositions synced with the transcript were very helpful.
     

3. What Jurors Think About Trials [PDF]: In this book chapter from a law professor at Northwestern University Law School, the surprisingly limited scientific study of jury trials is well-summarized. Here are some interesting findings:

  • About 40 percent of all jurors initially want to get out of jury duty. When they were done with jury service though, more than 60 percent thought highly of jury service.

  •  40 percent of jurors thought jury selection lasted too long.

  • Jurors "are active information processors who bring expectations and preconceptions with them to the jury box, filling in missing blanks and using their prior knowledge about the world to draw inferences from the evidence they receive at trial."

  • 51 percent of jurors wonder why certain people mentioned at trial did not testify. 27 percent of jurors held that very lack of testimony against the side that did not call the witness.

  • 83 percent of jurors in civil trials said that an exhibit helped them reach a decision. 
     
  • 30 percent of civil trial jurors say that the verdict ultimately reached was not the majority viewpoint when deliberations started.
I find many of these statistics fascinating and helpful, and I hope you do too. If you are aware of similar articles that discuss the scientific study of jurors, I would encourage you to post them in the comments section below.

Here are more than 80 additional articles and free downloadable books on A2L Consulting's site related to how juries think and behave:

jury consulting trial consulting jury research

About A2L Consulting

•  Leading national litigation consulting firm since 1995

•  Personnel nationwide

•  Routinely voted #1 for demonstrative evidence consulting, jury consulting or intellectual property litigation consulting nationally

•  Consulted for all major law firms on 10,000+ cases with trillions of dollars cumulatively at stake offering:

Trial Consulting: mock trials, Micro-Mock™, mock Markman hearings, jury consulting, shadow juries, jury selection and more; 

Trial Graphics: legal graphics and litigation graphics, courtroom animation, video, printed foam core trial exhibits, PowerPoint presentation consulting, simplifying the case story and more; 

Trial Technology & Onsite Personnel: ebriefs (electronic briefs), hot seat operators, trial technicians, courtroom presentations and more; 

Look for A2L trial consultants, graphics consultants and jury consultants in Washington, DC, Baltimore, MD, New York, NY, Boston, MA, Alexandria, VA, Atlanta, GA, Miami, FL, Chicago, IL, Houston, Texas, Los Angeles, CA, and San Francisco, California, Wilmington, Delaware, Philadelphia, PA, Phoenix, AZ, San Antonio, Palo Alto, Dallas, Detroit, Baltimore, Cleveland, Kansas City, Las Vegas, Pittsburgh, Richmond, VA, Salt Lake City, Denver, London, Dublin, Johannesburg, Brussels and many other cities and countries around the world. A2L Contact Information


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The Top 14 TED Talks for Lawyers and Litigators 2014

 

 


top ted talks for lawyers litigatorsby Ken Lopez

Founder/CEO
A2L Consulting

In 2012, I wrote an article called The Top 10 TED Talks for Lawyers. Back then, most readers didn't know what TED was. Now, just a couple of years later, a majority of people have heard of TED and most have usually seen at least one TED talk. Over the last several years, a number of TED offshoot events were launched that dramatically increased the footprint and influence of TED and its "ideas worth sharing." TEDx events are TED-like speaker conferences but are independently organized and usually quite local. TEDed videos are informative videos produced and posted online to teach about a particular topic of interest.

The list of TED talks I put together for lawyers and litigators in 2012 still holds up nicely, and I encourage you to browse it. In it, I included talks that focused on storytelling, neuroscience, juries and the legal system generally. For 2014, I want to share new videos on those same topics and also highlight a subject that the legal industry is passionate about: persuasion.

Even though lawyers engage in persuasion all the time, and it is at the core of the work we do, persuasion is something most are street-smart about, not book-smart. In other words, most people's knowledge of how to persuade tends to come naturally or is attained by observing how other talented persuaders behave.

I spend a great deal of time reading about the science of persuasion, studying those who do it well and practicing the craft myself. I tend to separate visual persuasion and oral persuasion, but they are, of course, fundamentally interrelated as many of these TED talks touch on. Across our service areas at A2L, persuasion is central to our jury consulting and our litigation graphics consulting practices. Thus, it is something we are consciously doing as litigation consultants and as visual persuasion consultants every day.

I hope that you enjoy my top 14 TED talks for lawyers of 2014 and can use these videos to improve your skills as a lawyer and litigator:
 

14. Influence at Work: Proven Science for Business Success: "Rarely, in isolation, does information influence or persuade us." At A2L, this sentence rings true with our core belief system and offers the primary reason our firm is hired by so many litigators. This speaker does a good job of discussing how information can overwhelm and introduces proven scientific techniques for persuasion. There are good lessons here for how to communicate with jurors.

 

13. Storytelling, Psychology and Neuroscience: A graduate student explains the connection between these three concepts in a way that would be useful for most lawyers to understand.

 

12. The Science of Stage Fright (and how to overcome it): I have seen many litigators with dozens of years of experience get nervous, sometimes distractingly so, in court. This TEDed presentation discusses the physiological effects of stage fright and how to overcome fear of public speaking.

 

11. Why We Should Trust Scientists: Frequently, litigation involves science. This talk provides a good framework for explaining why we should believe in science. It can be a useful guide for helping to explain to a jury why your expert is correct.

 

10. The Impact of Persuasion: As many TED speakers discuss, Don Norman discusses how social proof influences our behavior and other scientific concepts of persuasion. These concepts are useful to keep in mind when communicating with judges and juries.

 

9. The Aesthetics of Decision Making: The hero's journey is discussed and the real truths about how decisions are made are revealed.


8. Persuasion: Influencing the Rational Decision Maker:
A shopper strategy consultant discusses how people make decisions. Many lessons for persuasive visual communications are discussed.

 

7. Hear "Yes" More Often with the Science of Influence: This speaker discusses how to use influence and persuasion based on the latest science. Concepts such as information social influence, authority and reciprocity, are discussed.

 

6. 3 Ways the Brain Creates Meaning. Information designer Tom Wuject discusses something near and dear to me: how the brain processes visual imagery and makes meaning out of it. The applicability here for litigators is wide ranging. In particular, the techniques discussed here are excellent for case preparation in complex cases. Furthermore, he lays out some of the fundamental reasons that litigation graphics are essential in every single trial.


5. The Mystery of Storytelling: This TED Talk helps explain why most storytelling fails and offers a methodology for telling good stories. We have talked a lot about storytelling, written a book on the topic and even offer a recorded version of our popular storytelling for litigators webinar for free. This talk complements our work well by offering a structure for a good story.


4. How Your Working Memory Makes Sense of the World:
This talk focuses on the something we discuss frequently on our blog, namely, working memory. If you understand how working memory operates, you can better understand how to persuade an audience. In a nutshell, people have a very limited working memory. Thus, what we present at trial must be incredibly simplified and properly structured.

 

3. Leadership Storytelling: "Most stories do not work." Stories must be true, must be positive, must be simple and must contrast the before and after to be effective. Consider this when putting together your next opening or closing.

 

2. The Power of Story: PR agent Greg Power discusses why storytelling works.


1. How to Avoid Death by PowerPoint:
At A2L, we frequently write about how best to use PowerPoint, and how we work with litigators, CEOs and advocates to find the best ways to persuade using this tool. This speaker does a good job of summarizing many of our beliefs about what works best when persuading with PowerPoint. I don't agree on every point (e.g. the use of dark backgrounds), but we agree on almost every point. If you'd like to learn more about our recommendations for how to use PowerPoint, read our articles on the topic, download a free book we have written about it or watch our popular webinar about persuading with PowerPoint.

 

I hope that you have found this list helpful. If there are other good TED talks for lawyers, litigators or anyone seeking to persuade an audience, please post a link to them in the comments below.

Here are some related A2L Consulting articles about persuasion and the topics discussed in this article:

litigation consulting graphics jury trial technology

About A2L Consulting

•  Leading national litigation consulting firm since 1995

•  Personnel nationwide

•  Routinely voted #1 for demonstrative evidence consulting, jury consulting or intellectual property litigation consulting nationally

•  Consulted for all major law firms on 10,000+ cases with trillions of dollars cumulatively at stake offering:

Trial Consulting: mock trials, Micro-Mock™, mock Markman hearings, jury consulting, shadow juries, jury selection and more; 

Trial Graphics: legal graphics and litigation graphics, courtroom animation, video, printed foam core trial exhibits, PowerPoint presentation consulting, simplifying the case story and more; 

Trial Technology & Onsite Personnel: ebriefs (electronic briefs), hot seat operators, trial technicians, courtroom presentations and more; 

Look for A2L trial consultants, graphics consultants and jury consultants in Washington, DC, Baltimore, MD, New York, NY, Boston, MA, Alexandria, VA, Atlanta, GA, Miami, FL, Chicago, IL, Houston, Texas, Los Angeles, CA, and San Francisco, California, Wilmington, Delaware, Philadelphia, PA, Phoenix, AZ, San Antonio, Palo Alto, Dallas, Detroit, Baltimore, Cleveland, Kansas City, Las Vegas, Pittsburgh, Richmond, VA, Salt Lake City, Denver, London, Dublin, Johannesburg, Brussels and many other cities and countries around the world. A2L Contact Information


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The 13 Biggest Reasons to Avoid Last-Minute Trial Preparation

 

 

trial preparation litigation consultantsby Ken Lopez
Founder/CEO
A2L Consulting

When someone first works in the litigation consulting industry, the last-minute nature of trial preparation very often shocks them. In my experience, about half of all trial teams spend months or years preparing and testing themes, rhetorical strategies, and different approaches to their visual trial presentation. The other half of trial teams jam all trial preparation into the last month or two before trial.

No one approach is right for everyone, and I have certainly seen both approaches work well. After all if you are forced to prepare at the last minute, you're forced to simplify a case, and that's a good strategy for bench and jury trials. On the other hand, the ability to test and refine elements of the case is now a real science, and any case can benefit from a mock trial, the recommendations of litigation experts and other sophisticated testing.

While both strategies can work, when possible, I think slow and steady trial preparation wins the race more often. Still, we do great work in the last month before trial all the time, and sometimes there is just no other option. For those times when you have a choice, below are 12 reasons why last minute trial preparation might just set you back far enough to warrant starting now.

1. Last-minute costs more. I fear that some litigators believe that fewer hours available means lower cost for trial preparation. The opposite is usually true. Last-minute means your litigation consulting consultants have to use available staff rather than the ideal staff for a project. Often this leads to the use of more expensive staff and higher costs. Further, last minute trial preparation normally means using many more people to achieve the same result within a safe margin of error.

2. Building a good story takes time. We've written quite a bit about storytelling in the courtroom, we've published a book about storytelling in litigation, and we even have a webinar you can watch any time devoted to courtroom storytelling. The connection between storytelling and persuasion is a close one as scientific studies are increasingly proving. Unfortunately, like a fine wine, crafting a persuasive story is not something that should be rushed.

3. Maximizing persuasion in your litigation graphics takes time. Anyone can make a PowerPoint presentation quickly using a template and a few bullet points. However, as I wrote recently, Good-Looking Graphic Design ≠ Good-Working Visual Persuasion. If it's done well, it will be hard to do, require expertise and it will take time. I've written before about how the litigation graphics you don't use contribute enormously to your presentation, and an indicator of a good presentation is how full your trash can of unused litigation graphics is. To get to the point where you can reject some and keep others requires time for the creative process. See also, 16 PowerPoint Litigation Graphics You Won't Believe Are PowerPoint.

4. Getting your trial technology configured takes time. Rush or ignore your technology set up and months of preparation can be for naught. There's no winning back your credibility after a technology flub, a courtroom delay or an outright technological failure.

5. Mock trials really work. Mock trials are not about predicting precisely what will happen at trial as many lesser jury consultants might suggest. Rather, mock trials are useful for understanding how a judge or jury will react to the case, learning how an expert will perform, learning from practice what really works in your approach, learning your ideal juror profile, understanding your opposition's case and for helping to find those levers that will give you an edge at trial. See 7 Reasons In-House Counsel Should Want a Mock TrialWhy Do I Need A Mock Trial If There Is No Real Voir Dire?, 6 Good Reasons to Conduct a Mock Trial and 11 Problems with Mock Trials and How to Avoid Them. We have done a mock trial two-weeks before trial, but it is not an ideal approach. It is normally best to complete your final mock months before trial to give time for analysis and adjustment.

6. You wouldn't play a World Cup game without practicing (Congratulations to the U.S. team for advancing to the final 16 today!), why would you go to trial without some serious practice? See The Magic of a 30:1 Presentation Preparation RatioThe Very Best Use of Coaches in Trial Preparation3 Ways to Force Yourself to Practice Your Trial Presentation, and Practice, Say Jury Consultants, is Why Movie Lawyers Perform So Well.

7. Failing to understand the courtroom layout is a problem. Every court is different. Some will not accommodate an electronic presentation. Some do not easily accommodate a printed trial board. Some judges won't allow either. If you don't know these things in advance, you're setting yourself up for trouble and this all takes time to sort out.

8. There's every chance you'll win or lose in opening, so it's critical to get it right. See 6 Reasons The Opening Statement is The Most Important Part of a Case. Taking time to prepare your opening using modern approaches for drafting an opening statement requires ample lead time. See 7 Ways to Draft a Better Opening Statement and How to Structure Your Next Speech, Opening Statement or Presentation.

9. Too much gut. When trial preparation time is limited, a litigation team has to rely too heavily on its gut instincts and not enough on a scientific analysis of what will work. The good news is that successful litigators have the best people-focused gut instincts I've ever seen. However, great instincts coupled with great analysis, science, an outside perspective and modern trial expertise are always better.

10. You'll never be as confident as when you're well-prepared. Many in the litigation industry are great actors when it comes to feigning belief, indignation, and passion. It's part of the job. However, people can read subtle clues. If you're truly prepared and you know you are, confidence will come through. There's just no substitute for it, and it's not something that can be downloaded Matrix-style.

12. Settlement is less likely. As my colleague Dr. Laurie Kuslansky wrote in Don't Be the 2% - 6 Ways to Encourage Settlement with Trial Prep, there are so many ways to prepare for a case that simultaneously encourage settlement. When you prep a witness and test them and when you run a mock trial and understand strengths and weaknesses of a case, you are necessarily in a strong position to consider settlement. These steps take time.

13. Fewer Choices: When a student skips college, there's no reason they can't be as or more successful than a college graduate, but their options for success are more limited. The same is true with trial preparation. A trial team who waits until the last minute to prepare has fewer choices for how to prepare. I always prefer more choices, and I think most litigators and clients feel similarly.
 

complex civil litigation ebook free

Other A2L Consulting articles relating to trial preparation, litigation graphics and mock trial work:

 

About A2L Consulting

•  Leading national litigation consulting firm since 1995

•  Personnel nationwide

•  Routinely voted #1 for demonstrative evidence consulting, jury consulting or intellectual property litigation consulting nationally

•  Consulted for all major law firms on 10,000+ cases with trillions of dollars cumulatively at stake offering:

Trial Consulting: mock trials, Micro-Mock™, mock Markman hearings, jury consulting, shadow juries, jury selection and more; 

Trial Graphics: legal graphics and litigation graphics, courtroom animation, video, printed foam core trial exhibits, PowerPoint presentation consulting, simplifying the case story and more; 

Trial Technology & Onsite Personnel: ebriefs (electronic briefs), hot seat operators, trial technicians, courtroom presentations and more; 

Look for A2L trial consultants, graphics consultants and jury consultants in Washington, DC, Baltimore, MD, New York, NY, Boston, MA, Alexandria, VA, Atlanta, GA, Miami, FL, Chicago, IL, Houston, Texas, Los Angeles, CA, and San Francisco, California, Wilmington, Delaware, Philadelphia, PA, Phoenix, AZ, San Antonio, Palo Alto, Dallas, Detroit, Baltimore, Cleveland, Kansas City, Las Vegas, Pittsburgh, Richmond, VA, Salt Lake City, Denver, London, Dublin, Johannesburg, Brussels and many other cities and countries around the world. A2L Contact Information


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Mid-2014 Economic Outlook for the Litigation Industry

 

 

legal industry economics litigation consultingby Ken Lopez
Founder/CEO
A2L Consulting

Over the past couple of Decembers I've written articles offering an economic forecast for the coming year with a focus on litigation. These writings serve both to spread useful information to the legal industry and to help me to plan A2L's budget for the coming year. I thought a mid-year update might be valuable in these challenging economic times.

One might reasonably ask, if the focus is litigation, why would one look at the economy as a whole? First, there is no reliable litigation spending index that I am aware of, and second, my observation is that big-ticket civil litigation largely tracks the economy. When the economy is growing, litigation spending goes up. When the economy is shrinking or there is economic uncertainty (e.g. terrorist threats, massive changes to entitlement programs, election years etc.), cases settle and litigation spending shrinks.

While there are plenty of exceptions, many of A2L clients are large law firms with large corporations as customers. Large corporations are especially reactive to economic shifts. Indeed, for the most part, they are the economy, with Fortune 500 revenues now roughly equal to 78% of U.S. Gross Domestic Product (important note: not all of these revenues count toward U.S. GDP, such as overseas sales, so the actual percentage of GDP is much lower).

For the past 10 years, I've been watching one composite leading indicator from ECRI that does an excellent job of predicting the economy 6-9 months in the future. Last December, I observed that the U.S. economy was generally in a downtrend and that 2014 would look a lot like 2013 for litigation. That's largely held true unfortunately, and the economic news out today showing a massive Q1 contraction (revised way downward) is simply shocking. Perhaps though, there is a bit to be optimistic about.

Looking first at the bad news, in the first quarter (last quarter), we all saw the economy shrink by a historic 2.9%. To put that into perspective, look at the chart below to see the last few points in time we saw a contraction at or worse than today's level.

gdp contraction chart q1

That's right. The first quarter of 2014 is similar to points in 2009, 1991, 1983 and 1981. Yikes. That's pretty bad. To make matters worse, both the Federal Reserve and the Congressional Budget Office are forecasting painfully lackluster growth in the 2% range for the foreseeable future.

The only bright spots I am seeing are a meaningful uptick in the leading indicators and anecdotal evidence that our litigation practice is busy and looks to be setting up for an even busier 2015. We already have quite a number of mock trials being scheduled in 2014 for 2015 trials. Looking at the charts below, you can begin to see the difference between December's outlook and today's outlook. To quickly understand the charts, know that the green line represents a forecast about 8 months in the future from the date below any point. The blue line represents what actually happened at a given point in time in the economy. Even more simply, up is good, down is bad.

Last December 2013:

litigation market forecast 2014 ecri

Now (June 2014)

June 2014 economic outlook

The takeaway from the leading indicators here is this: In December of 2013, a downturn was forecast to continue (green line, upper chart). That downturn is reflected in the blue line in the lower chart stretching from October 2013 to March 2014. A modest uptick is forecast (green line, lower chart) that appears to run from roughly May 2014 through at least the end of the year. Let's hope that picks up steam.

For litigation, I would say things look slightly better than a year ago and much better than they did six months ago. The Q2 GDP number will be one to watch after it is revised a couple of times. I'm sure it will come out positive initially (they always seem to lately). The question will be whether it is revised to be negative later this year. If so, we would have two consecutive quarters of negative growth - an official recession. If that happens, you can bet Fortune 500s will cut back. They'll likely cut back on litigation modestly based on the Q1 number and wait for good news. If Q2 comes in negative, litigation spending cuts will likely get even deeper.

Articles related to the economics of the litigation market, law firm sales, pricing and more on A2L Consulting's site:

litigation consulting graphics jury trial technology

About A2L Consulting

•  Leading national litigation consulting firm since 1995

•  Personnel nationwide

•  Routinely voted #1 for demonstrative evidence consulting, jury consulting or intellectual property litigation consulting nationally

•  Consulted for all major law firms on 10,000+ cases with trillions of dollars cumulatively at stake offering:

Trial Consulting: mock trials, Micro-Mock™, mock Markman hearings, jury consulting, shadow juries, jury selection and more; 

Trial Graphics: legal graphics and litigation graphics, courtroom animation, video, printed foam core trial exhibits, PowerPoint presentation consulting, simplifying the case story and more; 

Trial Technology & Onsite Personnel: ebriefs (electronic briefs), hot seat operators, trial technicians, courtroom presentations and more; 

Look for A2L trial consultants, graphics consultants and jury consultants in Washington, DC, Baltimore, MD, New York, NY, Boston, MA, Alexandria, VA, Atlanta, GA, Miami, FL, Chicago, IL, Houston, Texas, Los Angeles, CA, and San Francisco, California, Wilmington, Delaware, Philadelphia, PA, Phoenix, AZ, San Antonio, Palo Alto, Dallas, Detroit, Baltimore, Cleveland, Kansas City, Las Vegas, Pittsburgh, Richmond, VA, Salt Lake City, Denver, London, Dublin, Johannesburg, Brussels and many other cities and countries around the world. A2L Contact Information


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The BIG List of All 337 Litigation Consulting Report Articles

 

 

litigation consulting report big listby Ken Lopez
Founder/CEO
A2L Consulting

Since 2011, we have published 337 articles on the Litigation Consulting Report blog. Our blog has been named one of the industry's best by the American Bar Association and now, five or ten people subscribe every day for free.

The amount of valuable content available at no charge is overwhelming. You can read articles organized by topic using the tags that appear in the lower right column of this blog. You can download e-books that organize articles into useful subject areas, and you can search A2L's entire 1200-page site by using the search field at the top of the right column.

Still, it's a lot of content to get your arms around. With this in mind, today I am listing all 337 articles below organized into five topic areas:

  • Litigation Graphics: includes articles about PowerPoint use at trial, animation, how one should use litigation graphics consultants, practice area specific graphics and more.
  • Jury & Trial Consulting: includes those articles that relate to the role of a jury or trial consultant, how to structure mock exercises and those articles that discuss how best to communicate with a judge or jury.
  • Trial Technology: includes articles about the best traits of a trial technician, how best to deploy technology in the courtroom, how to avoid technology problems and more.
  • E-Books & Webinars: provides a list of many of our e-books and webinars released over the past three years.
  • General: covers topics like economic conditions, witness preparation, tips for trial, storytelling, making presentations outside the courtroom and those articles that cut across multiple subject areas.
In each category, articles are listed newest first. I encourage you to browse for information that might be helpful to you, and I always welcome questions that you may have (lopez@A2LC.com). Social sharing and email article buttons are available on every article.

Litigation Graphics

Jury & Trial Consulting

Trial Technology and Trial Technicians

E-Books & Webinars

General

litigation consulting graphics jury trial technology

 

 

About A2L Consulting

•  Leading national litigation consulting firm since 1995

•  Personnel nationwide

•  Routinely voted #1 for demonstrative evidence consulting, jury consulting or intellectual property litigation consulting nationally

•  Consulted for all major law firms on 10,000+ cases with trillions of dollars cumulatively at stake offering:

Trial Consulting: mock trials, Micro-Mock™, mock Markman hearings, jury consulting, shadow juries, jury selection and more; 

Trial Graphics: legal graphics and litigation graphics, courtroom animation, video, printed foam core trial exhibits, PowerPoint presentation consulting, simplifying the case story and more; 

Trial Technology & Onsite Personnel: ebriefs (electronic briefs), hot seat operators, trial technicians, courtroom presentations and more; 

Look for A2L trial consultants, graphics consultants and jury consultants in Washington, DC, Baltimore, MD, New York, NY, Boston, MA, Alexandria, VA, Atlanta, GA, Miami, FL, Chicago, IL, Houston, Texas, Los Angeles, CA, and San Francisco, California, Wilmington, Delaware, Philadelphia, PA, Phoenix, AZ, San Antonio, Palo Alto, Dallas, Detroit, Baltimore, Cleveland, Kansas City, Las Vegas, Pittsburgh, Richmond, VA, Salt Lake City, Denver, London, Dublin, Johannesburg, Brussels and many other cities and countries around the world. A2L Contact Information


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5 Valuable (and Free) Complex or Science-Focused Litigation Resources

 

by Ken Lopez
Founder/CEO
A2L Consulting

Over the past 15 years, A2L Consulting has partnered with Innovative Science Solutions (ISS) on everything from tobacco litigation to hydraulic fracturing to alleged health effects of cell phones. Along the way, we have learned, often by overcoming enormous challenges, how to make science your ally.

Here are 5 completely free litigation resources based on that combined experience that I'd like to share with you:

floating-david-schwartz-issNew! This Wednesday!  Register: The Five Keys to Effective Scientific Information Management -  If you’re an attorney or someone who works with attorneys dealing with complex science-based litigation, you don’t want to miss this. All you have to do to register is click here for the 10am presentation or here for the 3pm presentation. If you have any questions you can contact Dr. David Schwartz directly at schwartz@innovativescience.net.

using-science-to-win-at-trial-200Read: Using Science to Prevail in Your Next Case or Controversy -  This book explores the unique relationship between science and the law. By looking at how your experts testify, how causation is established and how to explain science in an understandable way to jurors, this ebook breaks new ground for litigators.


experts-meld-evidence-with-argumentsNew!  Whitepaper: How Can Litigators Meld Expert Evidence with Winning Arguments - In this document, we have summarized many of the points we made in a webinar of the same name about how to identify, vet and prepare experts and how to develop winning demonstrative exhibits for expert testimony.

Watch: How Can Litigators Meld Expert Evidence with Winning Arguments - In this one-hour and fifteen minute webinar, Dr. David Schwartz shares how sophisticated litigation teams use both testifying and consulting experts to stay on message. Litigator turned litigation consultant Ryan Flax shares what he's learned about explaining complicated subject matter while trying complex cases for a dozen years. Ted Dunkelberger describes how to pick the best experts and how to make sure they are ready for trial. Watch now.

Read: What is the Value of Litigation Consulting? - We released it last month, and it has been one of our most popular litigation e-books to date already viewed by thousands of people. In it, we break down advice for litigators and ROI for clients into separate sections for litigation graphics, jury consulting and trial technology support. Download now.


Other articles and resources on A2L Consulting's site related to handing complex civil litigation, science-focused litigation and expert witnesses.

complex civil litigation ebook free

About A2L Consulting

•  Leading national litigation consulting firm since 1995

•  Personnel nationwide

•  Routinely voted #1 for demonstrative evidence consulting, jury consulting or intellectual property litigation consulting nationally

•  Consulted for all major law firms on 10,000+ cases with trillions of dollars cumulatively at stake offering:

Trial Consulting: mock trials, Micro-Mock™, mock Markman hearings, jury consulting, shadow juries, jury selection and more; 

Trial Graphics: legal graphics and litigation graphics, courtroom animation, video, printed foam core trial exhibits, PowerPoint presentation consulting, simplifying the case story and more; 

Trial Technology & Onsite Personnel: ebriefs (electronic briefs), hot seat operators, trial technicians, courtroom presentations and more; 

Look for A2L trial consultants, graphics consultants and jury consultants in Washington, DC, Baltimore, MD, New York, NY, Boston, MA, Alexandria, VA, Atlanta, GA, Miami, FL, Chicago, IL, Houston, Texas, Los Angeles, CA, and San Francisco, California, Wilmington, Delaware, Philadelphia, PA, Phoenix, AZ, San Antonio, Palo Alto, Dallas, Detroit, Baltimore, Cleveland, Kansas City, Las Vegas, Pittsburgh, Richmond, VA, Salt Lake City, Denver, London, Dublin, Johannesburg, Brussels and many other cities and countries around the world. A2L Contact Information


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