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  by Laurie R. Kuslansky, Ph.D. Managing Director, Jury Consulting A2L Consulting You’re defending an alleged polluter. You ask prospective jurors, “Who here thinks there is too much government regulation of business?” You represent an individual hurt in a workplace accident. You ask, “Has anyone ever filed a worker’s compensation claim?” Your client is an employer accused of gender discrimination. You ask, “Please raise your hand if you believe that workers sometimes claim wrongful treatment when they simply don’t get what they want.” Why would you do that, if the only answers you can get to these questions are ones that reveal potential allies? That is your adversary’s job, not yours. Your job is to help your supporters fly under the radar so that they can remain on the jury. If your question is likely to reveal nothing useful to you -- or worse, will point out who your friends are -- don’t use that question.

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  by Laurie R. Kuslansky, Ph.D. Managing Director, Jury & Trial Consulting A2L Consulting Q:  Per Glass Door’s 10 Biggest Job Likes and Gripes of Employees for year-end 2014,1 what do you think topped the lists of likes vs. gripes: co-workers or pay? A:  Good vs. annoying co-workers topped the lists; good vs. low pay trailed in slot 5: 10 Biggest Job Likes of Employees 1. Great Co-workers 2. Work Environment 3. Good Benefits 4. Interesting Work 5. Good Pay 6. Work-Life Balance   7. Flexible Work Schedule 8. Company Culture 9. Fast-Paced Environment 10. Smart People   10 Biggest Job Gripes of Employees 1. Annoying Co-workers 2. Poor Work-Life Balance 3. Poor Work Environment 4. Long hours 5. Low Pay 6. Management 7. Inflexible Work Schedule 7. Few Career Opportunities 8. Poor Company Culture 9. Few Training Opportunities 10. Little Fun   What are the implications for litigation involving the workplace and possible ways to avoid it?  Can’t we all just get along?  Maybe not. Employers may want to spend less time worrying about pay increases and pay more attention to the company their employees keep at their company. Perhaps you know that some people just don’t get along. If there isn’t a bad worker, just a personality conflict, forcing them to work it out may have been conventional wisdom, but offering alternatives may make more sense;

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  by Ken Lopez Founder/CEO A2L Consulting Not every page, blog article, webinar or e-book on A2L Consulting's site is right for everyone. As the saying goes, what is everyone's favorite radio station? WII – FM, of course. Otherwise known as "what's in it for me?" With hundreds of articles, dozens of e-books and hundreds of other pages, A2L's website has over 2,500 pages of valuable content. Sometimes, finding materials that are specific to your litigation practice area or need can be a challenge with all the available options. You can search A2L's site or even browse by topic area using a topic list in the sidebar of every blog post. In spite of this, I still hear from a lot of people who wonder whether we have experience working in their specific practice area or where they can find useful information related to their practice. I wrote this article to highlight some very useful information organized by practice area below. I've broken down the practice areas into 14 topics that cover most of the work we do. The alphabetical list with links under each topic should prove helpful when looking for the information most relevant to you.

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by Ryan H. Flax, Esq. (Former) Managing Director, Litigation Consulting A2L Consulting

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by Laurie R. Kuslansky, Ph.D Expert Jury Consultant

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