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And The Winner is . . . ?

  by Laurie R. Kuslansky, Ph.D.Managing Director, Jury Consulting A2L Consulting Nurse Kaci Hickox.  After she volunteered in Sierra Leone to treat Ebola patients, she headed to Newark airport to come home. Her timing was impeccable, because a mandatory quarantine was instituted on the ground while she was in the air. That day’s rule change was a reaction by New Jersey’s Gov. Christie to the frenzy caused by New York’s first Ebola patient, Dr. Craig Spencer, who visited numerous public places in two boroughs since his return from Guinea, before he developed fever and went to the hospital. Self-quarantine, evidently, would not satisfy a worried public.

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So Little Trust, So Much Double-Speak

  by Laurie R. Kuslansky, Ph.D. Managing Director, Jury Consulting A2L Consulting Funny how officials repeat how hard it is to get Ebola, that the NYC doctor did all the right things, that you can’t catch it when there aren’t symptoms, so there’s no need to sanitize the subway because there’s essentially no risk. New York’s health commissioner at the first press conference related that the doctor at issue kind of self-quarantined, but not really... 

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6 Ways to Convey Size and Scale to a Jury

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Although checklists are not as dramatic as other types of litigation graphics such as three-dimensional animations or interactive PowerPoint timelines, they can be very effective in persuading juries on key issues and in making it easier for them to recall the important elements of a case.

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Information Design and Litigation Graphics

by Ken Lopez The term information design is less than fifty years old.  The use of specialty trial graphics in the courtroom started less than thirty years ago.  Only very recently have the terms been used in the same sentence. That is, only recently have individual practitioners of both arts emerged. Wikipedia describes information design as "the skill and practice of preparing information so people can use it with efficiency and effectiveness. Where the data is complex or unstructured, a visual representation can express its meaning more clearly to the viewer."  I would call it simply the effective and efficient presentation of information. Applied to the litigation graphics consulting industry of which I am a member, I would add the word persuasive.  This is true since the job of the modern litigation graphics consultant is to persuade not merely to present information.

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