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  by Laurie R. Kuslansky, Ph.D. Managing Director, Jury Consulting A2L Consulting Research has shown that a variety of individuals are not fully represented in telephone surveys, especially Democrats,[1] the young, nonwhite, and urban voters who can be the hardest for pollsters to reach.[2] In addition, the migration from landline phones associated with home addresses to portable cell phones unrelated to home addresses compounds the problem of reaching and surveying a representative sample using traditional approaches to phone surveys. And, not all venues were created equally. Some have more hard-to-reach residents, while some have more cell phones replacing landlines.  In general, “It has become increasingly difficult to contact potential respondents and to persuade them to participate,”[3] dropping from 36% in 1997 to 9% now willing to participate in phone surveys.

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